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Grassroots Effort For Expanded Herring Run Trail Network


April 3rd, 2014 | Categories: Events, People, Programs | 3 comments

Herring Run under Loch Raven Blvd Insert Trail Here

The Herring Run stream valleys have untapped potential to become an incredible urban trail system

On a bitterly cold January evening in Lauraville, a group of trail enthusiasts got together to discuss how to make the Herring Run Trail much more than what it currently is. Trading ideas while huddled over maps, everyone involved brought a special skill to the meeting: a cartographer, a right-of-way specialist, a trail loving parks employee, a bike blazer, a trail development specialist, a bike shop owner, a bicycle planner, a university community liaison, bike advocates and avid hikers. Everyone also had personal knowledge of the Herring Run stream valley – what’s there and more importantly, what could be there. Before the evening was over, the next steps to creating a world class urban trail system along the Herring Run were set.

Hering Run under Northern PkwyStep 1: Go for a hike! On a similarly bitterly cold January morning, the first group of adventurers met at the corner of Herring Run Drive and Echodale Avenue. The morning’s plan was to hike or bushwack downstream to East Cold Spring Lane and determine where a trail could be developed. Heading south along the west bank, we passed through a ball field, then entered the woods where the deer and local kids blazed a thin trail which crosses a joining stream with an equally thin boardwalk. Running up against steep bank, we crossed to the east side and found a myriad of trails extending downstream to the Chinquapin Run confluence.

Herring Run Mt PleasantStep 2: Document that hike! The advent of GPS has made mapping hikes a breeze! Simply turn on Google’s “My Tracks” and walk. With a little cartographic magic, next thing you know, you can see your map in Google Earth. Add a few waypoints and some field notes and you’re almost ready to present it to Baltimore City Recreation and Parks. (But wait, there’s more) Field notes can include anything that would help or hinder the creation of a sustainable trail system; whether it be noted trail re-routes, brush removal and most importantly, trash removal. Being an urban park, many local residents believe the park to be their personal dumping ground. Such is not the case and needs to be remedied in many areas.

20140208_102710Step 3: Go for another hike and document THAT hike! While the hike from Echodale to Cold Spring was the first hike, it certainly wasn’t the last hike. Since then, similar expeditions have occurred

Points of interest discovered along the way:

Mar 1, 2014 11_13_04 AMStep 4: Present at the Baltimore City Trail Summit! It was determined early on the Trail Summit would be the perfect opportunity to share this endeavor with the public. What started out as a living room full of visionaries quickly expanded with enthusiastic volunteers wanting to be a part of this big project. There is no shortage of work to be done and many hands make light work.

View the HERRING RUN TRAIL NETWORK presentation from the Baltimore City Trail Summit

Step 5: Meet with the Friends of Herring Run Parks As this truly is a community project, bring in the stewards of the parks on Monday, May 19th.

Step 6: Repeat Steps 1, 2 & 3 There are many sections of the Herring Run watershed to explore. Future hikes include

 

Mar 1, 2014 11_10_29 AM

Frozen falls on the Herring Run


  • Megan

    My kids and I play and hike several times a week, mostly between Echodale and Cold Spring, sometimes further. We haul trash away from time to time as well. We have a blast, but we all shower off as soon as we’re home — that water is filthy! I can’t it being truly clean for many, many years.

  • Rachel

    Please post more about this. I’m really eager to help expand the trail!

  • http://www.bmorebikes.com/ B’more Bikes

    There was an exploratory hike along the “Highlandtown High Line” this past Sunday, which followed an abandoned rail line from Erdman Avenue to Highlandtown.

 

 


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